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Support for custom Menu Item and Editor features

In your Editor scriptsA piece of code that allows you to create your own Components, trigger game events, modify Component properties over time and respond to user input in any way you like. More info
See in Glossary
, use the ObjectFactory class to create new GameObjectsThe fundamental object in Unity scenes, which can represent characters, props, scenery, cameras, waypoints, and more. A GameObject’s functionality is defined by the Components attached to it. More info
See in Glossary
, components and Assets. When creating these items, the ObjectFactory class automatically uses default Presets. Your script does not have to search for and apply default Presets, because ObjectFactory handles this for you.

Support for new types

To support and enable Presets by default, your class must inherit from one of the following:

The Preset InspectorA Unity window that displays information about the currently selected GameObject, Asset or Project Settings, alowing you to inspect and edit the values. More info
See in Glossary
creates a temporary instance of your class, so that users can modify its values, so make sure your class does not affect or rely on other objects such as static values, Project Assets or SceneA Scene contains the environments and menus of your game. Think of each unique Scene file as a unique level. In each Scene, you place your environments, obstacles, and decorations, essentially designing and building your game in pieces. More info
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instances.

Tip: Using a CustomEditor attribute is optional.

Use case example: Preset settings in a custom Editor window

When setting up a custom EditorWindow class with settings that could use Presets:

  • Use a ScriptableObject to store a copy of your settings. It can have a CustomEditor attribute too. The Preset system handles this object.

  • Always use this temporary ScriptableObject Inspector to show the Preset settings in your UI(User Interface) Allows a user to interact with your application. More info
    See in Glossary
    . This allows your users to have the same UI in your EditorWindow and when editing saved Presets.

  • Expose a Preset button and use your own PresetSelectorReceiver implementation to keep your EditorWindow settings up-to-date when a Preset is selected in the Select Preset window.

The following script examples demonstrate how to add Preset settings to a simple EditorWindow.

This script example demonstrates a ScriptableObject that keeps and shows settings in a custom window (saved to a file called Editor/MyWindowSettings.cs):

using UnityEngine;

// Temporary ScriptableObject used by the Preset system

public class MyWindowSettings : ScriptableObject
{
    [SerializeField]
    string m_SomeSettings;
    
    public void Init(MyEditorWindow window)
    {
        m_SomeSettings = window.someSettings;
    }
    
    public void ApplySettings(MyEditorWindow window)
    {
        window.someSettings = m_SomeSettings;
        window.Repaint();
    }
}

Script example of a PresetSelectorReceiver that updates the ScriptableObject used in the custom window (saved to a file called Editor/MySettingsReceiver.cs):

using UnityEditor.Presets;

// PresetSelector receiver to update the EditorWindow with the selected values.

public class MySettingsReceiver : PresetSelectorReceiver
{
    Preset initialValues;
    MyWindowSettings currentSettings;
    MyEditorWindow currentWindow;
    
    public void Init(MyWindowSettings settings, MyEditorWindow window)
    {
        currentWindow = window;
        currentSettings = settings;
        initialValues = new Preset(currentSettings);
    }
    
    public override void OnSelectionChanged(Preset selection)
    {
        if (selection != null)
        {
            // Apply the selection to the temporary settings
            selection.ApplyTo(currentSettings);
        }
        else
        {
            // None have been selected. Apply the Initial values back to the temporary selection.
            initialValues.ApplyTo(currentSettings);
        }
        
        // Apply the new temporary settings to our manager instance
        currentSettings.ApplySettings(currentWindow);
    }
    
    public override void OnSelectionClosed(Preset selection)
    {
        // Call selection change one last time to make sure you have the last selection values.
        OnSelectionChanged(selection);
        // Destroy the receiver here, so you don't need to keep a reference to it.
        DestroyImmediate(this);
    }
}

Script example of an EditorWindow that shows custom settings using a temporary ScriptableObject Inspector and its Preset button (saved to a file called Editor/MyEditorWindow.cs):

using UnityEngine;
using UnityEditor;
using UnityEditor.Presets;

public class MyEditorWindow : EditorWindow

{
    // get the Preset icon and a style to display it
    private static class Styles
    {
        public static GUIContent presetIcon = EditorGUIUtility.IconContent("Preset.Context");
        public static GUIStyle iconButton = new GUIStyle("IconButton");

    }

    Editor m_SettingsEditor;
    MyWindowSettings m_SerializedSettings;
    
    public string someSettings
    {
        get { return EditorPrefs.GetString("MyEditorWindow_SomeSettings"); }
        set { EditorPrefs.SetString("MyEditorWindow_SomeSettings", value); }
    }
   
    // Method to open the window
    [MenuItem("Window/MyEditorWindow")]
    static void OpenWindow()
    {
        GetWindow<MyEditorWindow>();
    }

    void OnEnable()
    {
        // Create your settings now and its associated Inspector
        // that allows to create only one custom Inspector for the settings in the window and the Preset.
        m_SerializedSettings = ScriptableObject.CreateInstance<MyWindowSettings>();
        m_SerializedSettings.Init(this);
        m_SettingsEditor = Editor.CreateEditor(m_SerializedSettings);
    }

    void OnDisable()
    {
        Object.DestroyImmediate(m_SerializedSettings);
        Object.DestroyImmediate(m_SettingsEditor);
    }

    void OnGUI()
    {
        EditorGUILayout.BeginHorizontal();
        EditorGUILayout.LabelField("My custom settings", EditorStyles.boldLabel);
        GUILayout.FlexibleSpace();
        // create the Preset button at the end of the "MyManager Settings" line.
        var buttonPosition = EditorGUILayout.GetControlRect(false, EditorGUIUtility.singleLineHeight, Styles.iconButton);

        if (EditorGUI.DropdownButton(buttonPosition, Styles.presetIcon, FocusType.Passive, Styles.iconButton))
        {
            // Create a receiver instance. This destroys itself when the window appears, so you don't need to keep a reference to it.
            var presetReceiver = ScriptableObject.CreateInstance<MySettingsReceiver>();
            presetReceiver.Init(m_SerializedSettings, this);
            // Show the PresetSelector modal window. The presetReceiver updates your data.
            PresetSelector.ShowSelector(m_SerializedSettings, null, true, presetReceiver);
        }
        EditorGUILayout.EndHorizontal();
        
        // Draw the settings default Inspector and catch any change made to it.
        EditorGUI.BeginChangeCheck();
        m_SettingsEditor.OnInspectorGUI();

        if (EditorGUI.EndChangeCheck())
        {
            // Apply changes made in the settings editor to our instance.
            m_SerializedSettings.ApplySettings(this);
        }
    }
}

2017–03–27 Page published with limited editorial review New feature in 2018.1 NewIn20181

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Applying defaults to assets by folder
Asynchronous Shader compilation