Version: 2022.3
Language : English
Android environment setup
Android keystores

Android Player settings

This page details the Player Settings for the Android platform. For a description of the general Player settings, refer to Player SettingsSettings that let you set various player-specific options for the final game built by Unity. More info
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.

Player Settings for Android.
Player Settings for Android.

Documentation for the properties is grouped according to their respective sections in the Player UI(User Interface) Allows a user to interact with your application. Unity currently supports three UI systems. More info
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:

Icon

Use the Icon section to specify icons to represent your application on the device.

Icon settings for Android.
Icon settings for Android.
Property Description
Adaptive Specify textures of various sizes to represent your application on devices running Android 8.0 (API level 26) or higher.
Round Specify textures of various sizes to represent your application on devices running Android 7.1 (API level 25) or higher.
Legacy Specify textures of various sizes to represent your application on devices running versions earlier than Android 7.1 (API level 25).

Resolution and Presentation

Use the Resolution and Presentation section to customize aspects of the screen’s appearance.

Resolution and Presentation settings for Android.
Resolution and Presentation settings for Android.
Property Description
Fullscreen Mode Specifies how the window appears on the device. This sets the default window mode at startup.
Fullscreen Window The application window fills the full-screen native resolution of the device. To fill the full-screen window, Unity scales the application contents. Resolution Scaling Mode controls how Unity scales the contents. In this mode, the navigation bar is always hidden.
Windowed The application uses a standard, non-full-screen, movable window. The size of the window depends on the application’s resolution. In this mode, the window is resizable by default. To prevent window resizing, disable Resizable Window.
Resizable Window Indicates whether the user can resize the application’s window.
This setting enables multi-window capabilities in your application on Android phones and tablets. For more information, refer to Google’s developer documentation.
Default Window Width The default width of the application window in pixelsThe smallest unit in a computer image. Pixel size depends on your screen resolution. Pixel lighting is calculated at every screen pixel. More info
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. This option is only available if the Fullscreen Mode is set to Windowed.
Default Window Height The default height of the application window in pixels. This option is only available if the Fullscreen Mode is set to Windowed.
Minimum Window Width The minimum width of the application window in pixels. This option is only available if the Fullscreen Mode is set to Windowed.
Minimum Window Height The minimum height of the application window in pixels. This option is only available if the Fullscreen Mode is set to Windowed.
Hide Navigation Bar Indicates whether to hide the navigation bar that appears at the top of the window.
Render outside safe area Enable this option to allow the application to use all available screen space to render, including areas of the display that are cut out (notched). For more information, refer to Android’s display cutout support documentation.
Optimized Frame Pacing Enable this option to allow Unity to evenly distribute frames for less variance in frame rate and create a smoother experience.

Other Resolution and Presentation settings are grouped under the following sections:

Resolution Scaling

Use the Resolution Scaling section to customize settings relating to screen resolution scaling. Using a resolution lower than the device’s native resolution can improve performance and battery life.

Resolution Scaling settings for Android.
Resolution Scaling settings for Android.
Property Description
Resolution Scaling Mode Specifies whether and how the application scales its resolution. You can set the scaling to be equal to or lower than the native screen resolution. Using a lower resolution can improve performance and battery life.
Disabled Doesn’t apply resolution scaling and the application renders to the device’s native screen resolution.
FixedDPI Applies resolution scaling using a target DPI. Use this to optimize performance and battery life or target a specific DPI setting.
Letterboxed Adds black bars to the rendered output so the content doesn’t stretch. This process is called letterboxing.
Target DPI The resolution of the application. If the device’s native screen DPI is higher than this value, Unity downscales the application’s resolution to match this setting. Unity calculates the scale using min(Target DPI * Factor / Screen DPI, 1) where Factor is the Resolution Scaling Fixed DPI Factor from Quality settings.

Note: This option only appears when you set Resolution Scaling Mode to Fixed DPI.
Reset resolution on window resize Indicates whether to set the screen resolution to the new native window size when the native window size changes. If you set Resolution Scaling Mode to Fixed DPI, Unity recalculates the resolution based on Fixed DPI property.
BlitA shorthand term for “bit block transfer”. A blit operation is the process of transferring blocks of data from one place in memory to another.
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Type
Controls whether to use a blit to render the final image to the screen. Using a blit is compatible with most devices but is usually slower than not using a blit.
Always Unity renders to an offscreen buffer and then uses a blit to copy the contents of the buffer to the device’s framebuffer. This is compatible with most devices but is usually slower than not using blit.
Never Unity renders to the framebuffer provided by the device’s operating system. If this fails, the application prints a one-time warning to the device log. This is usually faster than using blit, but it isn’t compatible with all devices.
Auto Unity renders to the framebuffer provided by the device’s operating system if possible. If this fails, Unity prints a warning to the device console and uses a blit to render the final image to the screen.

Supported Aspect Ratio

Use the Supported Aspect RatioThe relationship of an image’s proportional dimensions, such as its width and height.
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section to customize settings relating to which device aspect ratios to support.

Resolution Scaling settings for Android.
Resolution Scaling settings for Android.
Property Description
Aspect Ratio Mode Specifies the largest aspect ratio the application supports. If the device’s aspect ratio is greater than this aspect ratio, Unity uses this aspect ratio for the application and adds black bars so the application doesn’t stretch.
Legacy Wide Screen (1.86) The application supports aspect ratios up to Android’s legacy wide-screen aspect ratio.
Native Aspect Ratio The application supports aspect ratios up to Android’s native aspect ratio.
Custom The application supports aspect ratios up to the aspect ratio you set in Up To.
Up To The custom maximum aspect ratio.
This setting only appears when you set Aspect Ratio Mode to Custom.

Orientation

Use the Orientation section to customize settings relating to the orientation of the application on the device.

Orientation settings for Android.
Orientation settings for Android.

Choose the game’s screen orientation from the Default Orientation dropdown menu:

Property Description
Default Orientation Specifies the screen orientation the application uses.

Note: Unity shares the value you set for this setting between Android and iOS.
Portrait The application uses portrait screen orientation where the bottom of the application’s window aligns with the bottom of the device’s screen.
Portrait Upside Down The application uses portrait screen orientation where the bottom of the application’s window aligns with the top of the device’s screen.
Landscape Right The application uses landscape screen orientation where the right side of the application’s window aligns with the bottom of the device’s screen.
Landscape Left The application uses landscape screen orientation where the right side of the application’s window aligns with the top of the device’s screen.
Auto Rotation The screen can rotate to any of the orientations you specify in the Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation section.
Auto Rotation Behavior Specify how the application window adjusts its orientation based on the device’s rotation sensor and orientation settings, when the Default Orientation is set to Auto Rotation.
Note: This property is visible only when you set the Default Orientation to Auto Rotation. By default, this property is set to User.
User The application window adjusts its orientation according to the device’s orientation settings. If the user locks the device’s auto rotate orientation setting, the application window doesn’t follow the preferences set in the Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation section. The application window only rotates as per the set preferences when the user turns off the device’s auto rotate orientation setting.
Sensor The application window adjusts its orientation according to the device’s rotation sensor regardless of the device’s orientation settings. However, the application window only rotates as per the preferences set in the Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation section.
Use 32-bit Display Buffer Indicates whether the display buffer holds 32-bit color values instead of 16-bit color values. Enable this setting if you see banding, or need alpha values in post-processing effects. Some post-processingA process that improves product visuals by applying filters and effects before the image appears on screen. You can use post-processing effects to simulate physical camera and film properties, for example Bloom and Depth of Field. More info post processing, postprocessing, postprocess
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effects require this because they create Render TexturesA special type of Texture that is created and updated at runtime. To use them, first create a new Render Texture and designate one of your Cameras to render into it. Then you can use the Render Texture in a Material just like a regular Texture. More info
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in the same format as the display buffer.
Disable Depth and Stencil Indicates whether to disable depth and stencil buffersA memory store that holds an 8-bit per-pixel value. In Unity, you can use a stencil buffer to flag pixels, and then only render to pixels that pass the stencil operation. More info
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.
Render Over Native UI Indicates whether to render on top of native UI on Android or iOS. For this setting to take effect, set your CameraA component which creates an image of a particular viewpoint in your scene. The output is either drawn to the screen or captured as a texture. More info
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’s Clear Flags to use a solid color with an alpha value lower than 1.
Show Loading Indicator Specifies if and how the loading indicator appears.
Don’t Show The loading indicator doesn’t appear.
Large A large loading indicator appears.
Inversed Large A large loading indicator appears with inversed color.
Small A small loading indicator appears.
Inversed Small A small loading indicator appears with inversed color.

Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation

Use the Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation section to specify which orientations the application supports when you set Default Orientation to Auto Rotation. This is useful, for example, to lock the application to landscape orientation but allow the user to switch between landscape left and landscape right.

This section only appears when you set Default Orientation to Auto Rotation.

Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation settings for Android.
Allowed Orientations for Auto Rotation settings for Android.
Property Description
Portrait Indicates whether the application supports portrait screen orientation where the bottom of the application’s window aligns with the bottom of the device’s screen.
Portrait Upside Down Indicates whether the application supports portrait screen orientation where the bottom of the application’s window aligns with the top of the device’s screen.
Landscape Right Indicates whether the application supports landscape screen orientation where the right side of the application’s window aligns with the top of the device’s screen.
Landscape Left Indicates whether the application supports landscape screen orientation where the right side of the application’s window aligns with the bottom of the device’s screen.

Splash Image

Use the Virtual Reality Splash Image setting to select a custom splash image for Virtual RealityVirtual Reality (VR) immerses users in an artificial 3D world of realistic images and sounds, using a headset and motion tracking. More info
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displays. For information on common Splash Screen settings, refer to Splash Screen.

Splash screen settings for virtual reality.
Splash screen settings for virtual reality.

Below the common Splash Screen settings, you can set up an Android-specific Static Splash Image.

Splash screen settings for Android.
Splash screen settings for Android.
Property Description
Image Specifies the texture that the application uses for the Android splash screen. The standard size for the splash screen image is 320x480.
Scaling Specifies how to scale the splash image to fit the device’s screen.
Center (only scale down) Draws the image at its native size unless it’s too large, in which case Unity scales the image down to fit.
Scale to Fit (letter-boxed) Scales the image so that the longer dimension fits the screen size exactly. Unity fills in the empty space around the sides in the shorter dimension in black.
Scale to Fill (cropped) Scales the image so that the shorter dimension fits the screen size exactly. Unity crops the image in the longer dimension.

Other Settings

This section allows you to customize a range of options organized into the following groups:

Rendering

Use these settings to customize how Unity renders your game for the Android platform.

Property Description
Color Space Choose which color space should be used for rendering: Gamma or Linear.
Refer to Linear rendering overview for an explanation of the difference between the two.
Auto Graphics API Disable this option to manually pick and reorder the graphics APIs. By default, this option is enabled, and Unity tries to use Vulkan. If the device doesn’t support Vulkan, Unity falls back to GLES3.2, GLES3.1 or GLES3.0.

Important: Unity adds the GLES3/GLES3.1/AEP/3.2 requirement to your Android App Manifest only if GLES2 isn’t in the list of APIs when Auto Graphics API is disabled. In this case only, your application doesn’t appear on unsupported devices in the Google Play Store.
Require ES3.1 Indicates whether to require that the minimum OpenGL ES 3 minor version is 3.1. This property is visible only if you enable Auto Graphics API or if Graphics APIs includes OpenGLES3.
Require ES3.1+AEP Indicates whether to require that the minimum OpenGL ES 3 minor version is 3.1+AEP. This property is visible only if you enable Auto Graphics API or if Graphics APIs includes OpenGLES3.
Require ES3.2 Indicates whether to require that the minimum OpenGL ES 3 minor version is 3.2. This property is visible only if you enable Auto Graphics API or if Graphics APIs includes OpenGLES3.
Color Gamut You can add or remove color gamuts to use for rendering. Click the plus (+) icon to see a list of available gamuts. A color gamut defines a possible range of colors available for a given device (such as a monitor or screen). The sRGB gamut is the default (and required) gamut.
Multithreaded Rendering Enable this option to move graphics API calls from Unity’s main thread to a separate worker thread. This can help to improve performance in applications that have high CPU usage on the main thread.
Static BatchingA technique Unity uses to draw GameObjects on the screen that combines static (non-moving) GameObjects into big Meshes, and renders them in a faster way. More info
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Enable this option to use Static batching.
Dynamic BatchingAn automatic Unity process which attempts to render multiple meshes as if they were a single mesh for optimized graphics performance. The technique transforms all of the GameObject vertices on the CPU and groups many similar vertices together. More info
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Check this box to use Dynamic Batching on your build (enabled by default).
SpriteA 2D graphic objects. If you are used to working in 3D, Sprites are essentially just standard textures but there are special techniques for combining and managing sprite textures for efficiency and convenience during development. More info
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Batching Threshold
Controls the maximum vertex threshold used when batching.
GPU Compute Skinning Calculate meshThe main graphics primitive of Unity. Meshes make up a large part of your 3D worlds. Unity supports triangulated or Quadrangulated polygon meshes. Nurbs, Nurms, Subdiv surfaces must be converted to polygons. More info
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skinningThe process of binding bone joints to the vertices of a character’s mesh or ‘skin’. Performed with an external tool, such as Blender or Autodesk Maya. More info
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and blend shapes on the GPU via shadersA program that runs on the GPU. More info
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to free up CPU resources and improve performance.
Graphics Jobs (Experimental) Enable this option to instruct Unity to offload graphics tasks (render loops) to worker threads running on other CPU cores. This is intended to reduce the time spent in Camera.Render on the main thread, which is often a bottleneck.
Note: This feature is experimental. It may not deliver a performance improvement for your project, and may introduce new crashes.
Texture compression format Choose between ASTC, ETC2 and ETC (ETC1 for RGB, ETC2 for RGBA). Refer to texture compression format overview for more information on how to pick the right format.
Refer to Texture compression settings for more details on how this interacts with the texture compression setting in the Build Settings.
Normal Map Encoding Choose XYZ or DXT5nm-style to set the normal mapA type of Bump Map texture that allows you to add surface detail such as bumps, grooves, and scratches to a model which catch the light as if they are represented by real geometry.
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encoding. This setting affects the encoding scheme and compressionA method of storing data that reduces the amount of storage space it requires. See Texture Compression, Animation Compression, Audio Compression, Build Compression.
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format used for normal maps. DXT5nm-style normal maps are of higher quality, but more expensive to decode in shaders.
Lightmap Encoding Choose Low Quality, Normal Quality, or High Quality to set the lightmapA pre-rendered texture that contains the effects of light sources on static objects in the scene. Lightmaps are overlaid on top of scene geometry to create the effect of lighting. More info
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encoding. This setting affects the encoding scheme and compression format of the lightmaps.
HDRhigh dynamic range
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CubemapA collection of six square textures that can represent the reflections in an environment or the skybox drawn behind your geometry. The six squares form the faces of an imaginary cube that surrounds an object; each face represents the view along the directions of the world axes (up, down, left, right, forward and back). More info
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Encoding
Choose Low Quality, Normal Quality, or High Quality to set the HDR Cubemap encoding. This setting affects the encoding scheme and compression format of the HDR Cubemaps.
Lightmap Streaming Whether to use Mipmap Streaming for lightmaps. Unity applies this setting to all lightmaps when it generates them.
Note: To use this setting, you must enable the Texture Streaming Quality setting.
Streaming Priority Set the priority for all lightmaps in the Mipmap Streaming system. Unity applies this setting to all lightmaps when it generates them.
Positive numbers give higher priority. Valid values range from –128 to 127.
Frame Timing Stats Enable this option to gather CPU/GPU frame timing statistics.
OpenGL: ProfilerA window that helps you to optimize your game. It shows how much time is spent in the various areas of your game. For example, it can report the percentage of time spent rendering, animating, or in your game logic. More info
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GPU Recorders
Indicates whether to enable profiler recorders when rendering with OpenGL. This option is always enabled for other rendering APIs but is optional on OpenGL due to potential compatibility issues with Frame Timing Stats and the GPU Profiler.
Allow HDR Display Output Activate HDR mode output when the application runs. This only works on displays that support this feature. If the display doesn’t support HDR mode, the game runs in standard mode.
Virtual Texturing Indicates whether to enable Virtual Texturing.
Note: Virtual Texturing isn’t compatible with Android.
Load/Store Action Debug Mode Highlights undefined pixels that may cause rendering problems on mobile platforms. This affects the Unity Editor Game view, and your built application if you select Development BuildA development build includes debug symbols and enables the Profiler. More info
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in Build Settings. Refer to LoadStoreActionDebugModeSettings.
Editor Only Highlights undefined pixels in the Game view in the Editor, but not your built application.

Vulkan Settings

Property Description
SRGB Write Mode Enable this option to allow Graphics.SetSRGBWrite() renderer to toggle the sRGB write mode during runtime. That is, if you want to temporarily turn off Linear-to-sRGB write color conversion, you can use this property to achieve that. Enabling this has a negative impact on performance on mobile tile-based GPUs; therefore, do NOT enable this for mobile.
Number of swapchain buffers Set this option to 2 for double-buffering, or 3 for triple-buffering to use with Vulkan renderer. This setting may help with latency on some platforms, but in most cases you should not change this from the default value of 3. Double-buffering might have a negative impact on performance. Do not use this setting on Android.
Acquire swapchain image late as possible If enabled, Vulkan delays acquiring the backbuffer until after it renders the frame to an offscreen image. Vulkan uses a staging image to achieve this. Enabling this setting causes an extra blit when presenting the backbuffer. This setting, in combination with double-buffering, can improve performance. However, it also can cause performance issues because the additional blit takes up bandwidth.
Recycle command buffers Indicates whether to recycle or free CommandBuffers after Unity executes them.
Apply display rotation during rendering Enable this to perform all rendering in the native orientation of the display. This has a performance benefit on many devices. For more information, see documentation on Framebuffer orientation.

Identification

Identification settings for the Android platform
Identification settings for the Android platform
Property Function
Override Default Package Name Indicates whether to override the default package name for your application.
Note: This setting affects macOS, iOS, tvOS, and Android.
Package Name Set the application ID, which uniquely identifies your app on the device and in Google Play Store. The application ID must follow the convention com.YourCompanyName.YourProductName and must contain only alphanumeric and underscore characters. Each segment must start with an alphabetical character. For more information, refer to Set the application ID.
Important: Unity automatically removes any invalid characters you type.
To set this property, enable Override Default Package Name.
Version Enter the build version number of the bundle, which identifies an iteration (released or unreleased) of the bundle. The version is specified in the common format of a string containing numbers separated by dots (For example, 4.3.2). (Shared between iOS and Android.)
Bundle Version Code An internal version number. This number is used only to determine whether one version is more recent than another, with higher numbers indicating more recent versions. This isn’t the version number shown to users; that number is set by the versionName attribute. The value must be set as an integer, such as “100”. You can define it however you want, as long as each successive version has a higher number.

For example, it could be a build number. Or you could translate a version number in “x.y” format to an integer by encoding the “x” and “y” separately in the lower and upper 16 bits. Or you could simply increase the number by one each time a new version is released.

Keep this number under 100000 if Split APKs by target architecture is enabled. Each APK must have a unique version code so Unity adds 100000 to the number for ARMv7, and 200000 for ARM64.
Minimum API Level Minimum Android version (API level) required to run the application.
Target API Level Target Android version (API level) against which to compile the application.

Configuration

Property Description
Scripting Backend Choose the scripting backend you want to use. The scripting backend determines how Unity compiles and executes C# code in your Project.
Mono Compiles C# code into .NET Common Intermediate Language (CIL) and executes that CIL using a Common Language Runtime. For more information, refer to MonoA scripting backend used in Unity. More info
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.
IL2CPP Compiles C# code into CIL, converts the CIL to C++ and then compiles that C++ into native machine code, which executes directly at runtime. For more information, refer to IL2CPPA Unity-developed scripting back-end which you can use as an alternative to Mono when building projects for some platforms. More info
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.
API Compatibility Level Choose which .NET APIs you can use in your project. This setting can affect compatibility with third-party libraries. However, it has no effect on Editor-specific code (code in an Editor directory, or within an Editor-specific Assembly Definition).

Tip: If you are having problems with a third-party assembly, you can try the suggestion in the API Compatibility Level section below.
.Net Framework Compatible with the .NET Framework 4 (which includes everything in the .NET Standard 2.0 profile plus additional APIs). Choose this option when using libraries that access APIs not included in .NET Standard 2.0. Produces larger builds and any additional APIs available aren’t necessarily supported on all platforms. Refer to Referencing additional class library assemblies for more information.
.Net Standard 2.1 Produces smaller builds and has full cross-platform support.
C++ Compiler Configuration Choose the C++ compiler configuration used when compiling IL2CPP generated code.
Debug Debug configuration turns off all optimizations, which makes the code quicker to build but slower to run.
Release Release configuration enables optimizations, so the compiled code runs faster and the binary size is smaller but it takes longer to compile.
Master Master configuration enables all possible optimizations, squeezing every bit of performance possible. For instance, on platforms that use the MSVC++ compiler, this option enables link-time code generation. Compiling code using this configuration can take significantly longer than it does using the Release configuration. Unity recommends building the shipping version of your game using the Master configuration if the increase in build time is acceptable.
Use incremental GC Uses the incremental garbage collector, which spreads garbage collection over several frames to reduce garbage collection-related spikes in frame duration. For more information, refer to Automatic Memory Management.
Allow downloads over HTTP Indicates whether to allow downloading content over HTTP. The options are Not allowed, Allowed in Development builds only, and Always allowed. The default option is Not allowed due to the recommended protocol being HTTPS, which is more secure.
Mute Other Audio Sources Enable this option if you want your Unity application to stop Audio from applications running in the background. Otherwise, Audio from background applications continues to play alongside your Unity application.
Target Architectures Specifies which architecture to target.
ARMv7 Enable support for ARMv7 architecture.
ARM64 Enable support for ARM64 architecture.
x86 (ChromeOS) Enable support for x86 architecture.
x86–64 (ChromeOS and Magic Leap 2) Enable support for x86–64 architecture.
Enable Armv9 Security Features for Arm64 Enable Pointer Authentication (PAuth, PAC) and Branch Target Identification (BTI) for Arm64 builds.

This property is visible only when Arm64 is set to true.
Split APKs by target architecture Enable this option to create a separate APK for each CPU architecture selected in Target Architectures. This makes download size smaller for Google Play Store users. This is primarily a Google Play store feature and might not work in other stores. For more details, refer to Multiple APK Support.
Target Devices Specifies the target devices on which the APK is allowed to run.
All Devices The APK is allowed to run on all Android and ChromeOS devices.
Phones, Tablets, and TV Devices Only The APK is allowed to run on Android phones, tablets, and TVs, but not on ChromeOS devices.
ChromeOS Devices Only The APK is allowed to run on ChromeOS devices, but not on Android phones or tablets.
Install Location Specifies application install location on the device (for detailed information, refer to Android Developer documentation on install locations.)
Automatic Let the operating system decide. User will be able to move the app back and forth.
Prefer External Install the application to external storage (SD card) if possible. The operating system doesn’t guarantee it; if not possible, the app will be installed to internal memory.
Force Internal Force the application to be installed to internal memory. The user will be unable to move the app to external storage.
Internet Access Choose whether to always add the networking (INTERNET) permission to the Android App Manifest, even if you aren’t using any networking APIs. Set to Require by default for development builds.
Auto Only add the internet access permission if you are using a networking API.
Require Always add the internet access permission.
Write Permission Choose whether to enable write access to the external storage (such as the SD card) and add a corresponding permission to the Android App Manifest. Set to External(SDCard) by default for development builds.
Internal Only grant write permission to internal storage.
External(SDCard) Enable write permission to external storage.
Filter Touches When Obscured Enable this option to discard touches received when another visible window is covering the Unity application. This is to prevent tapjacking.
Sustained Performance Mode Enable this option to set a predictable and consistent level of device performance over longer periods of time, without thermal throttling. Overall performance might be lower when this setting is enabled. Based on the Android Sustained Performance API.
Low Accuracy Location Enable this option to use low accuracy values with Android location APIs instead.
ChromeOS Input Emulation Indicates whether ChromeOS converts mouse and touchpad input events into touchscreen input events.
Android TV Compatibility Enable this option to mark the application as Android TV compatible.
Android Game Enable this option to mark the output package (APK) as a game rather than a regular application.

This property is visible only when Android TV Compatibility is set to true.
Android Gamepad Support Level Choose the level of support your application offers for a gamepad.

This property is visible only when Android TV Compatibility is set to true.
Works with D-Pad The application is fully operational with a D-pad. No gamepad is needed.
Supports Gamepad The application works with a gamepad, but doesn’t require it.
Requires Gamepad The application requires a gamepad to use.
Warn about App Bundle size Enable this option to receive a warning when the size of the Android App Bundle exceeds a certain threshold. This option is selected by default and you can only configure it if you enable the Build App Bundle (Google Play) option in the Build settings.
App Bundle size threshold Enter a size in MB. When your App Bundle exceeds this size, Unity will display a warning.
Active Input Handling Choose how to handle input from users.
Input Manager (Old) Uses the traditional Input settings.
Input System Package (New) Uses the Input system. This option requires you to install the InputSystem package.
Both Use both systems.

API Compatibility Level

You can choose your mono API compatibility level for all targets. Sometimes a third-party .NET library uses functionality that’s outside of your .NET compatibility level. To understand what’s going on in such cases, and how to best fix it, try following these suggestions:

  1. Install ILSpy for Windows.
  2. Drag the .NET assemblies for the API compatibility level that you are having issues with into ILSpy. You can find these under Frameworks/Mono/lib/mono/YOURSUBSET/.
  3. Drag in your third-party assembly.
  4. Right-click your third-party assembly and select Analyze.
  5. In the analysis report, inspect the Depends on section. The report highlights anything that the third-party assembly depends on, but that’s not available in the .NET compatibility level of your choice in red.

Shader Settings

Property Description
Shader Precision Model Select the default precision shaders use. For more information, refer to Use 16-bit precision in shaders.
Platform default Use lower precision on mobile platforms, and full precision on other platforms.
Unified Use lower precision if the platform supports it.
Strict shader variant matching Enable this option to use the error shader for rendering if a shader variant is missing in the Player build and display an error in the console. The error specifies the shader, subshader index, pass, and keywords used for shader variant search
Keep Loaded Shaders Alive Keep all loaded shaders alive and prevent unloading. For more information, refer to shader loading.

Shader Variant Loading Settings

Use these settings to control how much memory shaders use at runtime.

Property Description
Default chunk size (MB) Sets the maximum size of compressed shader variant data chunks Unity stores in your built application for all platforms. The default is 16. For more information, refer to Shader loading.
Default chunk count Sets the default limit on how many decompressed chunks Unity keeps in memory on all platforms. The default is 0, which means there’s no limit.
Override Enables overriding Default chunk size and Default chunk count for this build target.
Chunk size (MB) Overrides the value of Default chunk size (MB) on this build target.
Chunk count Overrides the value of Default chunk count on this build target.

Script Compilation

Script compilation settings for the Android platform
Script compilation settings for the Android platform
Property Description
Scripting Define Symbols Sets custom compilation flags.

For more details, see Platform dependent compilation.
Additional Compiler Arguments Adds entries to this list to pass additional arguments to the Roslyn compiler. Use one new entry for each additional argument.
To create a new entry, click Add (+). To remove an entry, click Remove (-).

When you have added all desired arguments, click Apply to include your additional arguments in future compilations. Click Revert to reset this list to the most recent applied state.
Suppress Common Warnings Indicates whether to display the C# warnings CS0169 and CS0649.
Allow ‘unsafe’ Code Enables support for compiling ‘unsafe’ C# code in a pre-defined assembly (for example, Assembly-CSharp.dll).
For Assembly Definition Files (.asmdef), click on one of your .asmdef files and enable the option in the Inspector window that appears.
Use Deterministic Compilation Indicates whether to prevent compilation with the -deterministic C# flag. With this setting enabled, compiled assemblies are byte-for-byte identical each time they are compiled.

For more information, see Microsoft’s deterministic compiler option.

Optimization

Optimization settings for the Android platform
Optimization settings for the Android platform
Property Description
Prebake Collision Meshes Adds collision data to Meshes at build time.
Preloaded Assets Sets an array of Assets for the player to load on startup.
To add new Assets, increase the value of the Size property and then set a reference to the Asset to load in the new Element box that appears.
Strip Engine Code Enable this option if you want the Unity Linker tool to remove code for Unity Engine features that your Project doesn’t use. This setting is only available with the IL2CPP scripting backend.

Most apps don’t use every available DLL. This option strips out DLLs that your app doesn’t use to reduce the size of the built Player. If your app is using one or more classes that would normally be stripped out under your current settings, Unity displays a debug message when you try to build the app.
Managed Stripping Level Chooses how aggressively Unity strips unused managed (C#) code. The options are Minimal, Low, Medium, and High.
When Unity builds your app, the Unity Linker process can strip unused code from the managed DLLs your Project uses. Stripping code can make the resulting executable significantly smaller, but can sometimes accidentally remove code that’s in use.

For more information about these options and bytecode stripping with IL2CPP, refer to ManagedStrippingLevel.
Vertex Compression Sets vertex compression per channel. This affects all the meshes in your project.
Typically, Vertex Compression is used to reduce the size of mesh data in memory, reduce file size, and improve GPU performance.

For more information on how to configure vertex compression and limitations of this setting, refe to Compressing mesh data.
Optimize Mesh Data Enable this option to strip unused vertex attributes from the mesh used in a build. This option reduces the amount of data in the mesh, which can help reduce build size, loading times, and runtime memory usage.

Warning: If you have this setting enabled, you should remember to not change material or shader settings at runtime.

For more information, refer to PlayerSettings.stripUnusedMeshComponents.
Texture MipMap Stripping Enables mipmap stripping for all platforms. This strips unused mipmaps from Textures at build time. Unity determines unused mipmaps by comparing the value of the mipmap against the Quality Settings for the current platform. If a mipmap value is excluded from every Quality Setting for the current platform, then Unity strips those mipmaps from the build at build time. If QualitySettings.masterTextureLimit is set to a mipmap value that has been stripped, Unity will set the value to the closest mipmap value that has not been stripped.

Stack Trace

Select your preferred stack trace method by enabling the option that corresponds to each Log Type (Error, Assert, Warning, Log, and Exception) based on the type of logging you require.

Logging settings for Android platform
Logging settings for Android platform
Property Description
None No logs are ever recorded.
ScriptOnly Logs only when running scriptsA piece of code that allows you to create your own Components, trigger game events, modify Component properties over time and respond to user input in any way you like. More info
See in Glossary
.
Full Logs all the time.

For more information, refer to stack trace logging.

Legacy

Enable the Clamp BlendShapes (Deprecated) option to clamp the range of blend shape weights in SkinnedMeshRenderers.

Legacy settings for the Android platform
Legacy settings for the Android platform

Publishing Settings

Use the following Publishing Settings to configure how Unity builds your Android application.

Android publishing panel
Android publishing panel

Note: For security reasons, Unity doesn’t save your Keystore or Project Key passwords.

Use the Keystore Manager window to create, configure and load your keys and keystores. You can load existing keystores and keys from either the Keystore Manager or the main Android Publishing panel. If you choose to load these from inside the Keystore Manager, Unity automatically fills the Project Keystore and Project Key fields. For further information, refer to the documentation on the Keystore Manager.

Project Keystore

A keystore is a container that holds signing keys for application security. For details, refer to Android developer documentation: Android keystore system.

Use the Project Keystore settings to choose which keystore to use for the open project. When you load a keystore, Unity loads all the keys in that keystore. To load and use an existing keystore in your open project:

  1. Enable Custom Keystore.
  2. Open the Select dropdown, select Browse, and choose a keystore from your file system.
  3. Enter your Keystore password.

If you don’t have an existing keystore, leave Custom Keystore disabled.

Unity uses a debug keystore to sign your application. A debug keystore is a working keystore. It allows you to sign the application and to test it locally. However, the app store will decline apps signed in this way. This is because the app store is unable to verify the validity and ownership of the application using a debug keystore.

Property Description
Custom Keystore Enable Custom Keystore to load and use an existing Keystore.
Select When Custom Keystore is enabled, use this to select the keystore you want to use. The keystores below the partition in the Select dropdown are stored in a predefined dedicated location. For more details, refer to Choose the keystore location.
Path You don’t need to enter your keystore path. Unity provides this based on the keystore you choose.
Password Enter your keystore password to load your chosen keystore.

Project Key

When you load a keystore, Unity loads all the keys in that keystore. Use the Project Key settings to choose one key from that keystore to use as the active key for the open project.

Property Description
Alias Select the key you want to use for the open project.
Password Enter your key Password.

Build

By default, Unity builds your application with the manifest files, GradleAn Android build system that automates several build processes. This automation means that many common build errors are less likely to occur. More info
See in Glossary
templates and Proguard files provided with the Unity installation. Use the Build section of the Android Publishing Settings to change these.

To use a custom manifest file, Gradle template or Proguard file:

  1. Enable the appropriate checkbox. Unity creates a default file in your project, and the file location appears below the checkbox.
  2. Open the new file and make your changes.
  3. Save your changes to this file. Unity automatically uses the changes saved to this file next time it builds the application.

The settings in the Build section only apply to the build process for the current project.

Property Description
Custom Main Manifest Customizable version of the Android LibraryManifest.xml file. This file contains important metadata about your Android application. For more information about the responsibilities of the Main/Unity Library Manifest, refer to Unity Library Manifest.
Custom Launcher Manifest Customizable version of the Android LauncherManifest.xml file. This file contains important metadata about your Android application’s launcher. For more information about the responsibilities of the Unity Launcher Manifest, refer to Unity Launcher Manifest.
Custom Main Gradle Template Customizable version of the mainTemplate.gradle file. This file contains information on how to build your Android application as a library. For more information, refer to the documentation on Gradle project files.
Custom Launcher Gradle Template Customizable version of the launcherTemplate.gradle file. This file contains instructions on how to build your Android application. For more information, refer to the documentation on Gradle project files.
Custom Base Gradle Template Customizable version of the baseProjectTemplate.gradle file. This file contains configuration that’s shared between all other templates and Gradle projects. For more information, refer to the documentation on Gradle project files.
Custom Gradle Properties Template Customizable version of the gradle.properties file. This file contains configuration settings for the Gradle build environment. This includes:
• The JVM (Java Virtual Machine) memory configuration.
• A property to allow Gradle to build using multiple JVMs.
• A property for choosing the tool to do the minification.
• A property to not compress native libs when building an app bundle.
Custom Gradle Settings Template Customizable version of the settingsTemplate.gradle file. This file contains declaration of artifact repositories to resolve external dependencies required for your application.
Custom Proguard File Customizable version of the proguard.txt file. This file contains configuration settings for the minification process. If minification removes some Java code which should be kept, you should add a rule to keep that code in this file. For more information refer to the documentation on Minification.

Minify

Minification is a process which shrinks, obfuscates and optimizes the code in your application. It can reduce the code size and make the code harder to disassemble. Use the Minify settings to define when and how Unity should apply minification to your build.

In most cases, it’s good practice to only apply minification to release builds, and not debug builds. This is because minification takes time, and can make the builds slower. It can also make debugging more complicated due to the optimization that the code undergoes.

Note: If the Java code is referenced via reflection, the minification process (R8/Proguard) cannot infer that the code is in use and strips that code. You can use Custom Proguard File to retain the code that you require.

The settings in the Minify section only apply to the build process for the current project.

Property Description
Release Enable this checkbox if you want Unity to minify your application’s code in release builds.
Debug Enable this checkbox if you want Unity to minify your application’s code in debug builds.

Split Application Binary

Enable the Split Application Binary option to split your output package into main (APK) and expansion (OBB) packages. The Google Play Store requires this if you want to publish applications larger than 100 MB.

PlayerSettingsAndroid

Android environment setup
Android keystores